Last edited by Taukasa
Saturday, May 9, 2020 | History

3 edition of Yugoslav economic system found in the catalog.

Yugoslav economic system

the first labor-managed economy in the making.

by Branko Horvat

  • 281 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by International Arts and Sciences Press in White Plains, N.Y .
Written in

    Subjects:
  • Socialism -- Yugoslavia.,
  • Communism -- Yugoslavia.,
  • Yugoslavia -- Economic policy -- 1945-1992.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliographical references.

    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 286 p.
    Number of Pages286
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15117831M
    ISBN 100873320743

    analyze the Yugoslav socialist economic system in a legal-, socio-, economic approach. Keywords: Yugoslavia, social property, Self administration of workers, Basic organization of associated labor, Economy. Introduction After the end of World War negotiations were undertaken with Author: Endri Papajorgji, Greta Alikaj. Corrections. All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:annpce:vyipSee general information about how to correct material in RePEc.. For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title.

    For more about self-management and Yugoslav economic and social innovations, "The Yugoslav Experiment, –" by Denison Rusinow is very much worth checking out. It was written in the 70s, but that might even be an advantage because a look into Yugoslavia is . The book is a little bit hard to follow at some The author mixes his personal account with testimonials from victims and lots of analyses of the political negotiations. He is able to build a coherent case of how the political leaders (from Yugoslavia and internationally, specially Germany) cynically led the region to ultimate disaster/5.

    The disintegration of Yugoslavia was the result of many factors, not of a single one, but the primary one, the author argues, was commitment of the Yugoslav political elite to the Marxist ideology of withering away of the state. Ideology had a central place in Yugoslav politics. The trend of decentralization of Yugoslavia was not primarily motivated by reasons of ethnic politics, but by /5(2). system established under the constitution prescribed the “nativization” of all Yugoslav peo-ples within their territorial, republican frame-works, Serbia was frustrated in this regard. Accord-ing to the constitution, Serbia was not a “sovereign” negotiating party like the other re-publics because of the “sovereignty” of its two au-File Size: KB.


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Yugoslav economic system by Branko Horvat Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Yugoslav Economic System (Routledge Revivals): The First Labor-Managed Economy in the Making: Economics Books @ Yugoslav Economic System: The First Labour-managed Economy in the Making: The First Labour-managed Economy in the Making [Horvat, Branko] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Yugoslav Economic System: The First Labour-managed Economy in the Making: The First Labour-managed Economy in the MakingAuthor: Branko Horvat. In his book, Horvat reviews the changes that have occurred in the Yugoslav economic system since Changes in policy, instruments used, and sectoral output are examined.

Yugoslav policy makers are faulted for failing to understand the distinction between changes in the system and changes in policy instruments available under : Jonathan Strauss. The Yugoslavian economic system, combining, as it does, elements of Marxist socialism with many aspects of free enterprise, represents a challenging experiment which is being closely watched by students of economic and political theory.

The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY), also known as SFR Yugoslavia or simply Yugoslavia, was a country located in Central and Southeastern Europe that existed from its foundation in the aftermath of World War II until its dissolution in amid the Yugoslav ng an area ofkm² (98, sq mi), the SFRY was bordered by the Adriatic Sea and Italy to the west Capital and largest city: Belgrade.

First published inthis book traces Yugoslav economic system book development of the Yugoslav economy from the end of the Second World War to the beginning ofwhich the author argues was a highly productive era of social innovation.

Drawing on personal experience of the Revolution, the Partisan Liberation War and. Read "The Yugoslav Economic System (Routledge Revivals) The First Labor-Managed Economy in the Making" by Branko Horvat available from Rakuten Kobo. First published inthis book traces the development of the Yugoslav economy from the end of the Second World War t Brand: Taylor And Francis.

The resulting economic reforms were slow, inefficient, and did not bring any effective changes in the functioning of the Yugoslav economic system. As those in the past, they did not touch upon the most fundamental features of the Yugoslav economic system – socialism, self-management and social property were to remain its basic : Milica Uvalić.

ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: "This book is an expansion and revision of Yugoslav economic policy in the post-war periodfirst published as a supplement to Vol. LXI, no. 5 of The American economic review.".

According to US economic advisers, only a highly unlikely combination of genuine privatization, massive Western economic investment and aid, and political moderation can salvage this economy.

GNP: $ billion, per capita $5,; real growth rate - % ( est.). On the other hand, self-management and market reforms undermined the system’s economic promises. Ironically, Yugoslav workers’ councils tended to empower managers, engineers, and white-collar workers over the lower-skilled working class.

The transformation of the Yugoslav economy after the Second World War is reflected in the pattern of change in its organizational framework.

The legal acts discussed in this chapter have been chosen for a comprehensive picture of these changes; they show that the Yugoslav economic system has undergone unusually frequent and substantial organizational overhauling since COVID Resources.

Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Such growth rates of unemployment and economic emigration are characterized as a sign of a deep recession in economic literature. Thus, the Yugoslav economy was in a terrible condition in the late s, but this was masked by the increase in foreign loans of epic proportions, combined with a dramatic increase in economic emigration.

Yugoslavia - Economic development: Volume 1 (English) Abstract. In Yugoslavs began to evolve a new economic system based on decentralized decision making.

A serious effort has been made to ensure that decentralized decisions be harmonized and coordinated in order to maintain a unified Yugoslav market. Rapid economic. Book Description. In this volume, Stojanović draws together several essays by Yugoslav economists to an English audience.

Originally published inthese works present and analyse the issues that faced Yugoslavia’s economic development and the functioning of their economic system at the time of writing through a wide selection of views.

In this chapter we begin by giving the reader the plan of the whole book. Then we discuss our particular political-economic approach.

After this discussion we present some definitions of the main kinds of political and economic systems, and we follow them with theoretical arguments from various points of view about how political and economic systems relate to each other.

for, systematic analysis. Among these forms, economic planning is one of the most characteristic and perhaps the most important for under-standing the operation of the Yugoslav economy.

However, planning in Yugoslavia cannot be treated in isolation. It can be studied and understood only as an integral part of the economic system. The Yugoslav Economic System J.

Marcus Fleming and Viktor R. Sertic* YUGOSLAVIA is a federal state in which there are four levels of government: Federation, Republics, Districts, and Communes. In this political organism, the main economic functions are exercised by the Federation and by the Communes.

Bornstein referred in particular to an article by J. Marcus Fleming and Viktor R. Sertic, “The Yugoslav Economic System,” which appears in the same book, pp. Thomas A. Marschak, “Centralized Versus Decentralized Resource Allocation: The Yugoslav ‘Laboratory,’” Quarterly Journal of Economics, vol.

82, #4 (November ), p Author: David Prychitko. Yugoslav economic performance in the s: alternative scenarios (English) Abstract.

This paper uses a multisector, computable general equilibrium model to analyze Yugoslav economic performance during the period. The model is used to generate both counterfactual historical simulations for the period and alternative forward-run Cited by: 5.Yugoslavia (/ ˌ j uː ɡ oʊ ˈ s l ɑː v i ə /; Serbo-Croatian: Jugoslavija / Југославија [juɡǒslaːʋija]; Slovene: Jugoslavija [juɡɔˈslàːʋija]; Macedonian: Југославија [juɡɔˈsɫavija]; lit.

'"Southern Slav Land"') was a country in Southeastern and Central Europe for most of the 20th century. It came into existence after World War I in under the name Capital and largest city: Belgrade, 44°49′N 20°27′E .According to various Yugoslav historians, the CPY—as the most loyal follower of the Communist International—thought that the Soviet Union had developed the “right experiences” in building socialist socio-economic relations and a political system which could be applied to all “socialist states” and which could be accepted by all.